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BEST PRACTICES

Sections:
[Standalone PC]
[Network]


Standalone PC

Run your PC from a UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply)
APC (American Power Conversion) makes high quality low cost models.

Use a virus checker that is automatically updated by the internet
Norton Anti-Virus, McAfee, Trend Micro, Inoculan (Make sure that the virus checker is set to quarantine files, not delete.)

Make frequent, regular data backups
Tape drives are the best, then CD RW, then ZIP disks.  (Floppy diskette are very poor backups devices.)  Store the backups in a secure location away from the PC.

If you are on the Internet, use some kind of firewall.
ZoneAlarm has a good one that is free for personal use. 

Regularly delete all files in the Temp directory, the Temporary Internet Files directory, and if you use Netscape or AOL, delete files from any Cache directories.


Regularly delete all files in the Temp directory, the Temporary Internet Files directory, and if you use Netscape or AOL, delete files from any Cache directories.
Don't use Netscape, AOL. or Microsoft Outlook to store files.  If messages or attachments are important enough to save, they should be copied to your regular document directory.  It is hard to search for documents in these programs, and as they accumulate large numbers of messages and attachments they become unstable and get corrupted.  If you don't have a good backup, you may lose all the messages and attachments. 

Make sure that your operating system and applications have the latest updates and patches.  (Make a backup and emergency repair disk before installing updates.)

When installing new programs it's a good idea to do a backup and emergency repair disk first.

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Network

Disclaimer:  NNI and/or its employees, and affiliates, provide the information on this website as a convenience for its customers.  NNI does not warrant the accuracy or applicability of the information or procedures included on these pages.  NNI and its employees or affiliates are not responsible for losses due to adverse, unexpected, or unsuccessful application of information and advice provided. 

Employees should receive training for understanding network storage and access to network devices and applications.
Users should know how to transfer files between workstations by using the server instead of floppies or E-Mail. 

As a server and its UPS approach three years of age they should be replaced or scheduled for replacement.

They are no longer reliable.

The server should be kept in a secure, air conditioned, locked area; preferably in an area with a glass door or window for visibility.

Servers should always have mirrored or RAID5 multiple hard drives.

There should be a telephone available at the server for technician use.

Run your Server from a UPS (Uninterruptible Power Supply).
APC (American Power Conversion) makes high quality models.

Use a server virus checker that is automatically updated by the Internet.
Norton Anti-Virus and McAfee are good.

Be sure that the server software has all of the latest updates and patches.

All data should be kept on the server.
All PC applications should be configured to save data on the server.

Users should be informed that data on local PC’s is not backed up.

Each user should have a home directory on the server for files that shouldn’t be shared by others.

Files that can be shared with multiple users are stored in shared directories on the server. 

Servers should always have tape drives for backups. 
Make daily, regular data backups. Verify the backup each day.  Keep a log of the date, number of bytes and files, errors.  Store the backups in a secure location away from the server.  Cycle at least one tape off site each day or week

If you are on the Internet, use some kind of Firewall.
Interjak, SonicWall, Cisco PIX. 

Save, catalogue and secure all original software, licenses, manuals and extra parts for all network components.  
Network components include servers, workstations, printers, hubs, routers, firewalls, and any other element of the network.  If possible, mark packages to match machines.  In particular, software license and serial numbers are frequently needed for reinstallation. 

Create documentation of all relevant information for the network, including network addresses, network layout, user names and passwords, licenses, modem phone numbers, wide area addresses and configurations, tech support phone numbers, and any other information that might be needed in the future to recover from failures or making changes or upgrades.

Keep support addresses and phone numbers for all vendors.  Record the purchase date of all components.  Fill out, copy, and mail all warranty cards.

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